Sitting above a restored 300-year-old building is a contemporary penthouse, whose owners envisioned Nordic style-meets Valletta in its interiors.

The main design challenge was how to effectively plan a penthouse on top of a twin-level rooftop. The front roof was two metres higher than the rest, meaning that setback penthouse would be totally cut off from its terrace if spread over one level.

The solution was to split the lower roof into three – the lowest level for the bedroom, then up three stairs to the dining area, up another three stairs to the kitchen, and then up a further three stairs to the terrace. This slow rise created a better relationship with the outdoor spaces, and allowed the architects to maximise its volume; fitting the couple’s brief in merely 65 square metres.

 

Sitting above a restored 300-year-old building is a contemporary penthouse, whose owners envisioned Nordic style-meets Valletta in its interiors.

The main design challenge was how to effectively plan a penthouse on top of a twin-level rooftop. The front roof was two metres higher than the rest, meaning that setback penthouse would be totally cut off from its terrace if spread over one level.

 

The solution was to split the lower roof into three – the lowest level for the bedroom, then up three stairs to the dining area, up another three stairs to the kitchen, and then up a further three stairs to the terrace. This slow rise created a better relationship with the outdoor spaces, and allowed the architects to maximise its volume; fitting the couple’s brief in merely 65 square metres.