TWO & A HALF LEMON 2006

Located on the oldest waterfront on the island, in a 16th century masonry vault within the former Treasury of the Knights of St. John, the client called his restaurant Two, and a Half Lemon. He wanted the space transformed into a hip restaurant selling Maltese delicacies with a contemporary twist.

So we spent a bit of time on site during the initial design stages; walking on floors paved with traditional patterned tiles. We sat on steel tables and chairs in the bar nearby, under medieval, wrought iron windows. And later had a cup of tea in granny’s white porcelain while looking at surrounding rooftops.

TWO AND A HALF LEMON INFO

Together with a team of artists & designers, decorative patterns on the floor tiles where traced and digitally printed on the upholstered tiles, creating an illusion of hardness on the soft wall. The outdoor seating became canvases for the original tiles, framed in marine plywood. A light wall hiding the kitchen was fragmented with wrought iron frames. Photos of the rooftops were printed inside the custom-made shades. A concrete cube (containing toilets) frames a niche of wash-hand-basins full of granny nostalgia.

 

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While at an art exhibition, we observed how a painting is usually framed to enhance its impact; some sort of form (the frame) follows function (the impact of the painting). With this project we wanted to take ‘the frame enhances the framed’ and turn it into ‘the framed enhances the function’. The functional elements of the bar (the seating, the restrooms and the low walls) were turned into frames containing typical Maltese aesthetic elements.

TWO AND A HALF LEMON SLIDESHOW 13

Images by David Pisani.

TWO & A HALF LEMON 2006

Located on the oldest waterfront on the island, in a 16th century masonry vault within the former Treasury of the Knights of St. John, the client called his restaurant Two, and a Half Lemon. He wanted the space transformed into a hip restaurant selling Maltese delicacies with a contemporary twist.

TWO AND A HALF LEMON INFO

So we spent a bit of time on site during the initial design stages; walking on floors paved with traditional patterned tiles. We sat on steel tables and chairs in the bar nearby, under medieval, wrought iron windows. And later had a cup of tea in granny’s white porcelain while looking at surrounding rooftops.

While at an art exhibition, we observed how a painting is usually framed to enhance its impact; some sort of form (the frame) follows function (the impact of the painting). With this project we wanted to take ‘the frame enhances the framed’ and turn it into ‘the framed enhances the function’. The functional elements of the bar (the seating, the restrooms and the low walls) were turned into frames containing typical Maltese aesthetic elements.

TWO AND A HALF LEMON SLIDESHOW

Together with a team of artists & designers, decorative patterns on the floor tiles where traced and digitally printed on the upholstered tiles, creating an illusion of hardness on the soft wall. The outdoor seating became canvases for the original tiles, framed in marine plywood. A light wall hiding the kitchen was fragmented with wrought iron frames. Photos of the rooftops were printed inside the custom-made shades. A concrete cube (containing toilets) frames a niche of wash-hand-basins full of granny nostalgia.

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PROJECT TEAM: Chris Briffa, Jennifer Barth, Simon Brugaletta, John Banthorpe, Sandra Banthorpe, Aldo Caruana.

Images by David Pisani.